VizWiz

Data Viz Done Right

November 12, 2019

#MakeoverMonday: Literacy Rates Around the World

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It's TC19 week and Eva has provided a data set about literacy rates around the World for the 1200+ people in Vegas to viz live plus the hundreds more of you that aren't live with us.

Here's the original viz:


What works well?

  • The data by region is ordered alphabetically, making it easy to find each region.
  • The bar chart is sorted by largest to smallest.
  • Nice filtering options

What could be improved?

  • A diverging color palette should only be used when there is a logical midpoint or goal. I don't see those in this viz.
  • The squares are hard to understand.
  • I don't find the map very useful. It would be more useful if it zoomed in when a region is selected.
  • There's no title.
  • There's too much text.
  • The bar chart seems to go out past the edge, or at least visually it appears that way.

What I did

  • I created a KPI scorecard so that I could understand the patterns for the overall or an individual country. Are literacy rates improving or regressing?
  • Show the distribution of the rates of the countries within each region
  • Within each region, which countries are above or below the median for that region?
  • How has the literacy rate changed over time?
  • Allow simple filtering options.

I drew inspiration from Workout Wednesday week 51 2018: Container Fun from Rody Zakovich. I love finding reasons to practice techniques I've tried before and want to master. Consider challenging yourself to learn something new each week.

Enjoy!

November 5, 2019

#TableauTipTuesday: Using Level of Detail Expressions to Count Items Exceeding a Threshold

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In this tip, I show three examples of using Level of Detail expressions to count members of a dimension in a view. I also show how parameters can be used for counting members based on thresholds.

I ended up babbling quite a bit as I created more examples; sorry for that, but I was on a roll.

November 4, 2019

How Many Rats Are Near Hungry Cat?

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Well, I don't really mean near YOU, I mean near people that live in New York. One of the fun datasets we play with at The Data School when I'm teaching them spatial analytics is Rat Sightings in New York.

And right after I taught this class to DS16, Lorna Eden posted the Workout Wednesday week 43 challenge. In this challenge, you had to find all casinos within X miles of a casino you click on. This required using the new DISTANCE function that came into Tableau 2019.3.1.

So, why not practice this technique more, but with rats? Instead of clicking on a casino, you can click on a rat to make it the Hungry Cat and find all rats within X miles of the cat. Silly, yes, and fun to practice too. The rats all have names too.

Lastly, I wanted to resize the dots based on the number of rats in the view. I used this blog post from The Data School, except I used an LOD instead of a table calc.

Enjoy! Find the rats near you.

November 3, 2019

#MakeoverMonday: Is Las Vegas Convention Attendance a Recession Indicator?

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Tableau Conference is headed to Vegas shortly, so I thought for Makeover Monday week 45 we should look at data about visitors to Las Vegas. The original viz comes from Calculated Risk:

SOURCE: Calculated Risk

What works well?
  • The time goes from oldest to latest.
  • The colors are easy to distinguish.
  • The axes are well labeled.
  • Including the caveat for 2019 since it's not a complete year in the data.

What could be improved?
  • The axes aren't synchronized; I'd like to see how they would look synchronized.
  • Without referring back to the color legend, I don't know which axis goes with which metric.
  • Using a dual axis chart implies there's a correlation between the two measures. There might be, but it could be displayed other way to make that more evident.
  • There no indicator of the data source.

What I did
I started by reading the original blog post. What caught my attention in particular was the last sentence:
Historically, declines in Las Vegas visitor traffic have been associated with economic weakness, so the slight declines over the last two years was concerning.

Super interesting! So this is where my worked started. I first annualized the data to make 2019 comparable to the rest of the years. From there, I created a connected scatterplot, which takes the two metrics in the original chart, plots one on the x-axis and the other on the y-axis, and connect the points by the year. This lead to a swirly look at the end, which made the relationship difficult to understand.

Instead, I chose to focus on the "red" line of the original, i.e., convention visitors. I wanted to see if convention visitors was indeed a recession indicator. The chart was simple to make, then some googling turned up the recession dates. Low and behold, convention visitors to Vegas sure do look like a leading indicator for a recession. If this is true, then we're on the verge of a recession very soon.

Click on the image for the interactive version.